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    What Is Companion Care?

    Companion care is used to describe the companionship and help with errands and light household chores, typically provided in your home by a paid home companion.

    Home companions allow family members or others who might care for you on a regular basis to have needed breaks.

    Besides spending time with you, home companions will often:

    • Run errands and shop for you
    • Drive you to and from doctors’ appointments
    • Perform light housekeeping and cleaning
    • Prepare or help you to prepare meals
    • Give you medication reminders

    Companion care is typically for seniors who are healthy and independent enough to stay in their own homes. Home care agencies provide companion care, but companion care can also be provided by relatives, friends, neighbors or others on a paid or volunteer basis. Companion care can also be provided to residents of assisted living facilities and nursing homes.

    Companion care is different than non-medical home care, which helps seniors who need help with routine tasks that they used to be able to do on their own such as bathing, grooming, mobility, and managing and taking their medicines.

    What Is Companion Care Like?

    As you age and have a harder time getting out of the house, you may begin to feel isolated and even lonely. A home companion will visit you on a regular basis and spend time with you. They can also help you to get out more by taking you to the grocery store, doctors’ appointments, or to social events.

    If you don’t feel like going out, they will usually run errands and take care of your shopping for you. They will also help you with housekeeping, laundry and cooking. It really depends on what you need and want.

    Home companions do not provide medical care, although they can do things like remind you to take your medications and help you to do exercises and stay fit.

    Is Companion Care Right for Me?

    Consider these statements below to determine if they describe you:

    Independence

    • I am still relatively healthy.
    • I like having my own living space.
    • I like being independent.
    • I do not want to leave my home.
    • I prefer to live on my own, but do not have a relative or friend who can stay with me all the time.

    Daily Living

    • I need help getting in and out of the bathtub or taking a bath or shower.
    • I need help getting dressed.
    • I need assistance with personal grooming.
    • I get my medicines mixed up or can’t remember when to take them.
    • I can no longer cook or need help preparing meals.
    • I can no longer drive or can only drive very short distances.
    • I no longer feel safe in my home.
    • I feel isolated in my home.

    If all or most of the Independence statements apply to you, but not the Daily Living statements, then Companion Care may be a good option for you.

    If most or all of the above Independence and Daily Living statements apply to you, and you do not need regular nursing or medical care, then consider these options:

    If most or all of the above Independence and Daily Living statements apply to you, and you ­also need regular nursing or medical care, then consider these options:

    What to Expect from Companion Care?

    Services

    Home companions will spend time with you and do things with you that you enjoy doing, such as playing games, going for walks, or taking you to family and social events.

    Their services may vary, but will typically include:

    • Running errands
    • Shopping for you or taking you shopping
    • Driving you to and from doctors’ appointments
    • Light housekeeping and cleaning
    • Preparing or helping you to prepare your meals
    • Reminding you to take your medication

    Costs

    Home care agencies typically charge for companion care based on an hourly rate. Some also require a minimum number of weekly or monthly hours.

    Since companion care is a non-medical service, it is not covered by Medicare. The care is usually paid for by the senior receiving care or by their family. Some long-term care insurance may also cover or partially cover companion care services.

    According to Genworth’s 2016 Cost of Care Survey, the National Daily Median cost of in Home Care (also known as Homemaker Services) in the United States is $125 per day.

    Introduction to Raleigh, North Carolina and Surrounding Areas

    Raleigh, North Carolina is the capital of North Carolina and the county seat of Wake County. Due to the prevalence of oak trees in the area, the city is widely known as the "City of Oaks". Its population of 27,000 makes it the second largest city in North Carolina, after Charlotte. Raleigh is part of The Triangle, which also includes Durham, and Chapel Hill. The Triangle is named for the Research Triangle Park, created in 1959, that is located between Durham and Raleigh. Raleigh is also one of the fastest growing cities in the United States.

    Raleigh Culture

    Raleigh is often referred to as the Smithsonian of the South because it has 20 free attractions. Its museums are of the highest caliber, from the interactive world museum, to the world's largest natural history museum, to the most comprehensive European art collection in the South. The arts are a big part of life in Raleigh and The Triangle. There is a wide range of cultural activities, including The BTI Center for the Performing Arts and the North Carolina Symphony. There are also many smaller community-oriented events, such as summer outdoor theater, parks, and gardens. Raleigh is also home to the Carolina Ballet, the North Carolina Theatre, and the Broadway Series South.

    Raleigh Sports and Leisure

    In the realm of professional sports, Raleigh has a lot of hockey to offer. The National Hockey League Carolina Hurricanes moved to the city in 1999 and play at the RBC Center. College sports are also prevalent here, such as NCAA Atlantic Coast Conference member North Carolina State University, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Duke University. St. Augustine College and Shaw University also provide great competition and viewing. Bike routes such as the NC-DOT Mountains to Sea and the US Maine to Florida routes go through Raleigh. Amateur sports like soccer, softball, flab football, basketball, and dodgeball leagues are offered throughout the city. Golf is also a popular activity in Raleigh, with quality public golf courses across the metropolitan area.

    Raleigh Outdoors

    Outdoor opportunities in Raleigh revolve around the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Atlantic Coast, both of which are located relatively close to the city. These two geographic features provide an endless range of outdoor activities such as skiing and snowboarding at one of the area's ski resorts. Warm, sunny beaches await visitors along the coast, with breezes coming up from the Gulf Stream. The city has award-winning parks, greenway systems, and open spaces across the metropolitan area. The Mountains of North Carolina provide many opportunities to hike to the tops of towering peaks, fish in pristine trout streams, or camp under a blanket of stars.

    Raleigh at Night

    Raleigh has excellent nightlife, being rated near the top of America's Best Place for Singles, Cities that Rock, and Best Small Concert Venues. The area combines big city vibrancy with small-town charm. With five different entertainment districts, Raleigh offers a wide variety of small live music venues and large performing arts facilities. There's fun and entertainment for everyone in the city of Raleigh. For example, the Greenshields Brewery and Pub is known for brewing its own beer. The Hiberian features hearty soups and plenty of wine and beer.