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    Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC)

    These retirement communities allow seniors to "age in place," with flexible accommodations that are designed to meet their health and housing needs as these needs change over time.

    Residents entering continuing care retirement communities sign a long-term contract that provides for housing services and nursing care, usually all in one location, enabling seniors to remain in a familiar setting as they grow older.

    Many seniors enter into a Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC) contract while they are healthy and active, knowing they will be able to stay in the same community and receive nursing care should this become necessary.

    Continuing care retirement communities offer service and housing packages that parallel independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing facilities. Seniors who are independent may live in a single-family home, apartment or condominium within the continuing care retirement community.

    If they begin to need help with activities of daily living (e.g., bathing, dressing, eating, etc.); they may be transferred to an assisted living or skilled nursing facility on the same site.

    Seniors who choose to live in a continuing care retirement community find it reassuring that their long-term care needs will be met without the need to relocate.

    Continuing Care Retirement Communities Are Your Style If …

    You don't want to have to move around every few years. You might not need the extra help now, but who can predict the future?

    With this senior housing option, you can enter into a contract that assures you that your care will grow and change with your needs.

    A CCRC is a great example of aging in place, since it lets you stay put!

    Continuing Care Retirement Communities Checklist Of Things To Consider

    • How is the staff? You want one that will be there when you need them, but leave you alone when you don't.
    • How do the other residents like it? Don't be scared to ask one, or have a resident as your tour guide.
    • What plans are in place for the changing needs of residents?
    • Are the common areas comfortable and well maintained?

    Cost Of Continuing Care Retirement Communities

    CCRC's can vary in both cost structure and their schedule of fees. Some require a sizeable endowment and have a schedule of minimum monthly fees while others require less of an upfront investment with heftier monthly fees based on the care level needed.

    Some properties sell their "active section" as deeded real estate which the property buys back in the event a resident develops a need for more care.

    The best way to understand the varying degrees of financial commitment is to call the retirement community you are interested in.

    Introduction to Cincinnati, Ohio and Northern Kentucky Surrounding Areas

    Cincinnati, located in southwestern Ohio on the Ohio River, is the third-largest city in the state. Founded in 1788 and incorporated as a city in 1819, it was named after the Society of the Cincinnati, which honored George Washington, whom they likened to the Roman General Cincinnatus. The city saw dramatic growth in the mid 1830s with the development of steamships and the completion of the Ohio and Erie Canal. It soon became a major shipping center, primarily for the pork industry. Cincinnati's location on the Ohio River has contributed not only to its prosperity but also its scenic charm. Winston Churchill once called Cincinnati "the most beautiful of America's inland cities".

    Today, Cincinnati has a population of around 340,000 and is home to major corporations that include Procter & Gamble, Kroger, CInergy Corporation, and Federated Department Stores, the parent company of Macy's and Bloomingdale's. Cincinnati ranked #37 on Ladies Home Journal's 2002 list of the Best Cities For Women (all but one of the cities ranking higher had larger populations). With a metro area that includes parts of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, Cincinnati has a unique personality that crosses midwestern industrial city with a southern country feel. Sarah Jessica Parker, Nick Lachey and Carmen Electra all hail from Cincinnati. Talk show host Jerry Springer was once its mayor.

    Cincinnati Culture

    Today, Cincinnati has a population of around 340,000 and is home to major corporations that include Procter & Gamble, Kroger, CInergy Corporation, and Federated Department Stores, the parent company of Macy's and Bloomingdale's. Cincinnati ranked #37 on Ladies Home Journal's 2002 list of the Best Cities For Women (all but one of the cities ranking higher had larger populations). With a metro area that includes parts of Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky, Cincinnati has a unique personality that crosses midwestern industrial city with a southern country feel. Sarah Jessica Parker, Nick Lachey and Carmen Electra all hail from Cincinnati. Talk show host Jerry Springer was once its mayor.

    Cincinnati Sports and Leisure

    Cultural attractions in Cincinnati include the Contemporary Arts Center, the Cincinnati Art Museum and the American Classical Music Hall of Fame and Museum. An obsolete railroad terminal has been revamped to house two museums: the Museum of Natural History and Science and the Cincinnati Historical Museum. The downtown architecture, with many art deco buildings, is another cultural draw, and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra is one of the oldest orchestras in the country. The city hosts the International Wine Festival each March. On the first Monday in September, the Labor Day Riverfest features fireworks and a festive party scene. Cincinnati's sizeable German population makes its Octoberfest (held, oddly enough, in September) one of the country's largest and most authentic. And any day is a good day for Cincinnati's famous Skyline Chili, served over spaghetti.

    Sports are big in Cincinnati. Major league baseball's oldest team, the Cincinnati Reds, play at the 42,000-seat Great American Ballpark downtown on the banks of the Ohio River. The NFL's Cincinnati Bengals play next door at 65,600-seat Paul Brown Stadium. Also in the area is US Bank Arena, which hosts the International Hockey League's Cincinnati Cyclones. The University of Cincinnati and Xavier University have nationally competitive basketball programs that draw a strong local following.

    Cincinnati Outdoors

    With its riverfront location and a climate that's neither too hot nor too cold, Cincy is perfectly situated for recreational activities. The city claims one of the country's top park systems, with more than 100 parks spread over 5,000 acres. Sharon Woods Park is a 750-acre park with a lake surrounded by a 2.6-mile hiking and biking trail, along with restored 19th-century buildings. Shawnee State Park, 90 minutes away in Portsmouth, is a 60,000-acre park in the Appalachian foothills, offering golf, fishing, swimming, boating, several hiking trails, and camping facilities. For golfers, there are more than a dozen courses within the city and dozens more within a small radius. In the winter, skiing is available within an accessible distance. Perfect North Slopes, 30 minutes from the city, has more than a dozen runs on 70 acres. Spicy Run Resort, 90 miles east of Cincinnati in Latham, has trails for all levels and facilities for snowboarders. Mad River Mountain, 130 miles away in Bellefontaine, boasts Ohio's highest skiing elevation (1,460 ft) and has 15 trails and a snow tubing park on 120 acres.

    Cincinnati at Night

    Cincinnati has an energetic nightlife, with Main Street the main attraction, especially around the intersection of 12th Street. The Mount Adams neighborhood just east of downtown is a funky area, with upscale restaurants, bars and clubs. The Corryville district near the University of Cincinnati is another popular area to find diverse evening entertainment options. Riverboat casinos are available in Indiana just 20 minutes away.