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What Is Medical Home Health Care?

Medical home health care, also just called home health care, provides you with the same type of care you would receive in a facility like a nursing home right in your own home. This type of care can include skilled nursing care, physical therapy, and assistance with medications, but really depends on what’s been prescribed by your doctor.

Medical home health care is licensed medical care provided in your home. It is very different than non-medical home care, in which caregivers help with daily activities such as bathing, getting dressed, grooming, moving about, and managing and taking medications.

Medical home health care is typically provided by licensed medical professionals like nurses or physical therapists, who will only perform specific tasks that have been prescribed by your doctor.

What Is Medical Home Health Care Like?

With medical home health care, licensed medical professionals such as RNs and LPNs will give you the medical care you require right in your home. However, they will only provide the specific services prescribed by a doctor. The medical professionals who come to your home to care for you are typically assigned by a state-licensed home health care agency.

It’s important to note that your doctor’s orders are typically needed to begin home health care. Once your doctor refers you for services, the home health care agency will usually schedule an appointment and come to your home to talk to you and your family about your needs, and to ask questions about your health. And as the agency’s staff cares for you, they will provide the doctor with updates on your progress.

Home health care is often used following surgery, when you are able to leave the hospital, but still require medical attention. If that’s the case, the nurses caring for you will perform tasks like changing bandages on wounds, inserting and removing catheters and IVs, giving you injections for pain and monitoring your progress. You may also need home health care if you’re suffering from an illness or have an unstable health status, and want to stay in your home.

Besides medical care, home health care services will often include educating the patient and family on how to provide ongoing care and on things like diet and nutrition.

Medical home health care may be delivered in conjunction with other types of home services, such as companion care, in which a home companion spends time with you and helps with household chores, cooking, errands and transportation; and non-medical home care, which is when a home care aide assists you with personal care like bathing, grooming, going to the bathroom, and moving about in your home.

Is Medical Home Health Care Right for Me?

Consider these statements below to determine if they describe you:

Independence

  • I need medical or nursing care on a regular basis.
  • I like having my own living space.
  • I like being independent.
  • I do not want to leave my home.
  • I prefer to live on my own, but do not have a relative or friend who can stay with me all the time.

Daily Living

  • I need help getting in and out of the bathtub or taking a bath or shower.
  • I need help getting dressed.
  • I need assistance with personal grooming.
  • I get my medicines mixed up or can’t remember when to take them.
  • I can no longer cook or need help preparing meals.
  • I can no longer drive or can only drive very short distances.
  • I no longer feel safe in my home.
  • I feel isolated in my home.

If most or all of the above Independence statements apply to you, then medical home care is a good option if you are able to stay in your home.

  • If you are unable to stay in your home, then also consider skilled nursing care.
  • If most or all of the Daily Living statements also apply to you, then you should consider companion care, in addition to medical home health care, if you are able to stay in your home.

If most or all of the above Independence and Daily Living statements apply to you, but you do not need nursing or medical care on a regular basis, then companion care may be a good option for you if you are able to stay in your home.

  • If you are unable to stay in your home, then you may want to consider assisted living.

What to Expect from Medical Home Health Care?

Services

According to Medicare, home health care staff should typically perform the following tasks when caring for you:

  • Check what you’re eating and drinking.
  • Check your blood pressure, temperature, heart rate and breathing.
  • Check that you’re taking your prescription and other drugs and any treatments correctly.
  • Ask if you’re having pain.
  • Check your safety in the home.
  • Teach you about your care so you can take care of yourself.
  • Coordinate your care. This means they must communicate regularly with you, your doctor, and anyone else who gives you care.

If you receive home health care following surgery, they may also provide the following types of services:

  • Changing bandages on wounds
  • Inserting and removing catheters and IVs
  • Giving you injections for pain
  • Administering medication
  • Monitoring your progress

Keep in mind that services will vary depending on what your physician has ordered.

Costs

Home health care costs can vary based on where you live and the length of time you need care. Home health care that is ordered by a doctor is typically covered by Medicare, but only for a limited amount of time.

According to Genworth’s 2016 Cost of Care Survey, the National Daily Median cost of Home Health Care in the United States is $127 per day.

Introduction to Lynchburg, Virginia and Surrounding Areas

Lynchburg is an independent city (meaning a city not belonging to a county) located in central Virginia, near the cities of Roanoke, Danville, and Charlottesville. Nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, the city is situated approximately 180 miles southwest of the nation's capital, Washington, D.C. Principal highways in the city include U.S. Route 29, 221, 460, and 501.

Incorporated as a town in 1805 and as a city in 1852, Lynchburg got its name from its founder, John Lynch, who was granted a charter in 1786 by the Virginia General Assembly for a town on 45 acres of his own land. The 19th century saw prosperity for Lynchburg, a center of manufacturing and commerce whose principal industry was tobacco. The onset of the 20th century brought a change in Lynchburg's economic base from tobacco to manufacturing. A large number of factories opened, many of which remained cornerstones of the economy for many years, allowing the city to grow and diversify. Colleges, libraries, and housing developments slowly populated the town over the years, to the point where today's Lynchburg is a vibrant community with a strong industrial base and is a regional center for retail and commerce.

Known as the "City of Seven Hills" (College Hill, Garland Hill, Daniel's Hill, Federal Hill, Diamond Hill, White Rock Hill, and Franklin Hill), Lynchburg was frequented often by Thomas Jefferson, who maintained a nearby residence (Poplar Forest). The city is home to several colleges and universities, including Liberty University, established in the 1980s as Liberty Baptist College by televangelist and Lynchburg resident Jerry Falwell.

Lynchburg Arts, Culture, and Entertainment

Lynchburg's rich history and unspoiled beauty make it a natural setting for a wealth of historical landmarks, cultural events, and recreational activities. Some of the more prominent are as follows:

  • Academy of Fine Arts: Houses both an active studio theatre and an historic theatre undergoing renovation
  • Amazement Square, The Rightmire Children's Museum: Four spacious floors of interactive exhibitions, workshops and educational programs
  • Anne Spencer House and Garden: Honoring the internationally acclaimed poet who was the only black woman and the only Virginian included in the Norton Anthology of Modern American and British Poetry
  • Daura Gallery Museum: More than 1,000 paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints
  • Legacy Museum of African-American History: Explores all aspects of local African American history and culture
  • Liberty University Theater: Located on Liberty University's main campus
  • Lynchburg Museum/Old Court House
  • Maier Museum of Art
  • Miller Claytor House
  • Old City Cemetery
  • Sandusky Historic Site & Civil War Museum
  • South River Meeting House
  • The James River Heritage Trail

Although Virginia does not have a major league sports team, the city of Lynchburg is rich in baseball history. Minor League professional baseball has existed here since 1894, when the Lynchburg Hill Climbers brought baseball to the city. The team, which played in the Virginia League until the league disappeared in 1943, underwent some name changes during that time, becoming the Shoemakers, then the Grays, then the Senators. The team moved to the Piedmont League in 1943 and remained there until 1955 as the Lynchburg Cardinals. After a few more league changes and name changes, the team settled down in 1995 as the Lynchburg Hillcats of the Carolina League, where they remain to this day. The Hillcats are a class High-A affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Introduction to Roanoke, Virginia and Surrounding Areas

Roanoke is situated in the Roanoke Valley, west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The city is known as the "Star City of the South" and features the prominent Roanoke Star on Mill Mountain. The Appalachian Trail, the Blue Ridge Parkway and a wine making region are nearby. The Roanoke River runs through the town. The city is a major center for health care and retail businesses for the region.

History or Roanoke

The town was founded in 1852 and was known as Big Lick. The name was selected due to the huge outcropping of salt in the area. Big Lick was chosen as a railroad junction which significantly increased the population and stimulated the economy. In 1884 the town was established as Roanoke. During the Colonial era the city was a prominent location for trails and roads. The Great Wagon Road was one of the busiest roads during the 18th Century and ran through Roanoke.

The Norfolk and Western Railway company produced steam locomotives in Roanoke and employed thousands of workers. The locomotives were manufactured in the city until 1953. Manufacturing companies moved to the city primarily due to the railroad. Regarding land, the city significantly expanded during the middle portion of the 20th Century due to annexation. Roanoke was once a prominent area for the garment industry.

Roanoke Transportation

The city is served by the Roanoke Regional Airport. The Valley Metro provides bus transportation.

Attractions

  • The Center in the Square contains the History Museum of Western Virginia, the Science Museum of Western Virginia as well as the Hopkins Planetarium.
  • Virginia Museum of Transportation features locomotives which were constructed in the city.
  • Grandin Village.
  • Mill Mountain Star.
  • Texas Tavern.
  • Roanoke's Historical Fire Station #1.
  • St. Andrews Parish, State and National Landmark.
  • Roanoke Historic Farmers Market.
  • Hotel Roanoke is a historic building.
  • The Jefferson Center is a historic performance center.
  • Mabry Mill.

Activities and Entertainment

The surrounding area offers excellent opportunities for boating, fishing, camping and hiking. Some of the popular locations for activities and entertainment include:

  • Appalachian Trail
  • Virginia's Explore Park
  • Smith Mountain Lake
  • Blue Ridge Parkway
  • Mill Mountain Zoo
  • Roanoke Civic Center
  • George Washington & Jefferson National Forest
  • Commonwealth Games of Virginia
  • Mill Mountain Theater

Introduction to Shenandoah Valley, Virginia and Surrounding Areas

"The Big Valley"
The Shenandoah Valley stretches 200 miles across the Blue Ridge and Allegheny mountains. It's been nicknamed "The Big Valley" and immortalized in song, dance, film and television.

The history and heritage of the region includes many sites devoted to the pioneers who traveled westward, settled and farmed - those like the Frontier Culture Museum in Staunton and Cyrus McCormick's Farm in Raphine. He invented the first reaper!

During the Civil War this region was nicknamed "The Breadbasket of the Confederacy." In Lexington, visit Virginia Military Institute and Washington & Lee University - where Gen. Robert E. Lee served as president after the war and where the Lee Chapel & Museum is located. See battlefields - New Market Battlefield State Park and Fisher's Hill Battlefield.

Another historical site of the region is the Birthplace of President Woodrow Wilson.
Outdoor Wonderland

The Shenandoah Valley features picture-perfect postcard farms and inns along country roads and the popular Skyline Drive and Blue Ridge Parkway. One of the natural wonders of this world is the Natural Bridge. Be sure to visit the region's many caverns, which include Luray, with the only stalacpipe organ, and Shenandoah, with an elevator to take you underground!

If you're interested in the great outdoors, you'll love the hiking trails, paddle sports and horseback riding in the Blue Ridge Mountains, too!

Two popular resorts are in the Shenandoah Valley: Bryce and Massanutten, which offer year-around activities. And don't forget the beautiful Shenandoah National Park with its portion of the Appalachian Trail and two resorts, too!

You'll be singing "Oh, Shenandoah!" when you arrive and experience this magnificent "Big Valley" for yourself.

ref: Virginia.org

Lynchburg Public Libraries

Lynchburg Public Library
2315 MEMORIAL AVENUE
Lynchburg, Virginia
(434) 847-1577
Library Web Site

Lynchburg Hospitals

CENTRA HEALTH
(Voluntary non-profit - Private)
1920 ATHERHOLT ROAD
(434) 947-4705
Emergency Service: Yes

CENTRAL VIRGINIA TRAINING CENTER
(Government - Local)
PO BOX 1098
(804) 947-6000
Emergency Service: Yes

Roanoke Public Libraries

Botetourt County Library
28 AVERY ROW
Roanoke, Virginia
(540) 977-3433

Roanoke City Public Library
706 S. JEFFERSON ST.
Roanoke, Virginia
(540) 853-2473
Library Web Site

Roanoke County Public Library
3131 ELECTRIC ROAD S.W.
Roanoke, Virginia
(540) 772-7507
Library Web Site

Roanoke Hospitals

CARILION MEDICAL CENTER
(Voluntary non-profit - Private)
1906 BELLEVIEW AVENUE
(540) 981-9407
Emergency Service: Yes

Shenandoah Valley Public Libraries

Allen County Pl
200 E. BERRY STREET
Fort Wayne, Indiana
(260) 421-1200 - (317) 269-1700
Library Web Site

Shenandoah Valley Hospitals

Shenandoah Memorial Hospital
759 S Main St, Woodstock, VA 22664
(540) 459-1100
Emergency Service: Yes
Website